K9 Fit Club Archives - K9 Fit Club

June 24, 2016

Recently our founder, Tricia Montgomery, was featured in an article for WebMD called “Women’s Health Tips for Heart, Mind, and Body”. We love hearing K9 Fit Club’s name in the press, read below for a sneak peak on Tricia’s take on how to maintain a healthy lifestyle while still indulging in the occasional treat, of the human variety of course.

Follow a Heart-Healthy Diet

There’s an easy recipe if your goal is to keep away problems like heart disease and strokes.

  • Eat more fruits and veggies.
  • Choose whole grains. Try brown rice instead of white. Switch to whole wheat pasta.
  • Choose lean proteins like poultry, fish, beans, and legumes.
  • Cut down on processed foods, sugar, salt, and saturated fat.

When eating healthy, flexibility often works best, says Joyce Meng, MD, assistant professor at the Pat and Jim Calhoun Cardiology Center at UConn Health. If you like to follow a strict diet plan, go for it. If not, it’s OK. “Find what works for you.”

Tricia Montgomery, 52, the founder of K9 Fit Club, knows first-hand how the right diet and lifestyle can help. For her, choosing healthy foods and planning small, frequent meals works well. “I don’t deny myself anything,” she says. “I still have dessert — key lime pie, yum! — and I love frozen gummy bears, but moderation is key.”

 

SEE ORIGINAL ARTICLE

 


September 9, 2013

the-newest-trend-in-healthDog Fitness and Dog and Person Fitness is on the rise and becoming the newest trend. It seems every day, another business or person unleashes a new class or decides to offer a person and pooch fitness class.

Since K9 Fit Club isn’t everywhere (just yet), and dog fitness programs and classes generally aren’t regulated (although we are working on it), it’s up to you to do your research and make sure the program you consider follows certain standards.

K9 Fit Club offers the following suggestions to consider before you and Fido sign up for just any program.

Training and Credentials – Trainers should have experience and training in the services they are offering. All K9 Fit Club trainers are Certified Personal Trainers and K9 Fit Club Certified. All dog trainers and dog wranglers are also certified in Positive Dog Training Certification and K9 Fit Club Certified. K9 Fit Club offers a list of their credentials and affiliations within each facility.

Veterinary Emergencies – “It is also important that the fitness facility have qualified staff that has some experience in veterinary care,” says Tricia Montgomery, Founder & President at K9 Fit Club. “Always ask what their staff qualifications are, and make sure they have a veterinarian who can attend to emergencies or situations that might arise.” Each K9 Fit Club has a veterinarian on consult, along with an affiliation with a veterinarian who can be called for after-hours emergencies if when needed.

Programs Offered: The program or facility should be able to tailor programs for not only a person’s needs but a dog’s age, breed, weight range and additional health-related issues. Make sure the exercises and programs are fundamentally sound. From Begging for Beginner to Bow Wow Bootcamp, K9 Fit Club offers a wide range of programs for both novice and advanced.

Equipment: Equipment used within classes and programs are equally as important to the classes themselves. Is the equipment used specific for dogs and people? Is the equipment safe for both? Since dogs are different from humans, is the equipment used specific for a dog’s needs. Just like humans, the ability to maintain endurance, balance and engage core muscles for strength is important. “Dogs need products that were designed for the way they move, think and learn,” adds Krista Wickens CEO of DogTread Canine Fitness Equipment, “to ensure proper movement and form is maintained during exercise.” K9 Fit Club has partnered with FitPaws/FitBall and DogTread to provide all participants, both two legs and four, with a great and safe workout!

Assessments, Evaluations & Healthy to Participate: Does the program offer an assessment and an evaluation for the newbies? Are there special classes designed for the new participants to learn the basic fitness moves and obedience commands? Does the program require a veterinary standard or Healthy to Participate form? K9 Fit Club offers both, a Healthy to Participate and Assessments/Evaluations prior to participation in any class. K9 Fit Club additionally offers a Begging for Beginner Workout and an Intro to K9 Fit Club class providing any participant a great, safe workout.

Ratio of Instructors and Dog/Owner per Class: Safety for dog, owner, participants and instructors is a big concern for any class involving both dogs and people. To ensure a safe, effective and most of all FUN workout for all participants, evaluate the number of instructors per class, per the number of dog and owner teams. Can the staff designate and handle an aggressive or fearful dog? Are there enough instructors in the class to properly monitor the number of participants within the class? At K9 Fit Club, our classes are limited to 8-10 participants per class, with a minimum of 2 instructors, CPT and Trainer/Wrangler, both certified in K9 Fit Club Certification.

 

Programs for Disability: Is the program you and your pooch considering for the buff of the buff or the six-pack crowd? Is there an entrance for the seniors of disabled? Are their programs tailored for anyone? Although K9 Fit Club is dedicated to health, fitness and wellness, most of all, we leave no one behind. Whether a Sit & Be Fit or Waggin’ Wheelchair, K9 Fit Club has a program designed for you.

Accidents & Procedures: Make sure the program offered is up to date on certifications. Additionally, make sure they have an emergency plan to deal with whatever may happen. No one wants to think about, or plan for the worst. However, when it does occur, having plans in place can make the difference in any life or death situations.

Facility – Cleanliness is next to Godliness!:) The facility should be clean, welcoming and designed with your both dog and person in mind. Evaluate how each dog and owner enters and is greeted. The area should be secure to prevent canine escapes, should a dog become off leash. The facility should maintain liability insurance. K9 Fit Club maintains veterinary approved AVMA, AAHA and OSHA standards for each club.

As with any aspect of your dog’s health, you should consult with your veterinarian before you and your dog engage in a new fitness routine.

K9 Fit Club is growing a Nationwide Community of Clubs dedicated to the Health, Fitness and Wellness of both dog and owner. Changing Lives One Dog at a Time™.

Tricia

Tricia Montgomery
Founder & President, K9 Fit Club

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August 14, 2013

You know it’s good for you. You know that exercise can give you energy, help you maintain a healthy weight, keep your muscles and joints flexible, help you live longer, and above all, make you feel better.

IMG_5416If you and your dog are getting a little more “pooch”, you’re not getting enough exercise–but neither are they. Simply walking the dog more often than only once a day can add a significant calorie debt to your balance sheet. Better yet, fit dogs, like people, tend to have fewer reasons to go to the doctor, less chance of cancers, and less risk of joint ailments.

Not only can exercise extend your furry friends’ lives; it may also expend some of their nervous energy and make them a little less likely to chew on the living room drapes.

The thing is, nobody’s filled pets in on all of these benefits of exercise! Without someone to lead the way, they’re not going to run laps or do leg lifts in their spare time.

So as a wonderful pet parent, part of your job is ensuring all your family members get safe, enjoyable exercise on a regular basis–whether they’re children, dogs, cats or ferrets! All pets need some physical activity to live a happy, healthy life.

Different dogs need different amounts of exercise, so you’ll want to talk to your veterinarian before starting your pet’s workout program. With a proper assessment, you can embark on an exercise program that won’t seem like work at all–to your best friend, its play.

Getting in shape is a win-win for everyone, not just in terms of losing weight, but making a commitment to do exercise together

DOGS – THEY GET US MOVING!

IMG_5342You don’t want to hit the ground running with your pooch, though. Just as with any animal–or person–you’ll want a veterinary assessment before you start your dog’s fitness routine. With this assessment, you can discuss plans and ensure your dog has a clean bill of health.

Just remember, like people who aren’t used to exercise, dogs should start off slow. And as we say at K9 Fit Club, a little bit of something is better than a whole bunch of nothing!

 

Moderately paced walking and swimming are a good way to start—both people and pooch athletes build their cardiovascular and muscle strength without putting undue stress on their joints.

A 15-minute walk in the morning and evening, combined with an appropriate diet, can be meaningful. As you and your pet get stronger, you can graduate to longer walks on the weekend, hiking, biking, and even running.

Once he’s adapted to the exercise, you and your dog can run and walk to your heart’s content, if you take a few precautions.

  • Keep a close eye on your dog: watch for any unusual signs of fatigue or trouble breathing.
  • If your pup wants to stop, let him.
  • Dogs that overdo it can suffer strained tendons or ligaments or other orthopedic problems.
  • Don’t expect your fuzzy buddy to be a weekend warrior, even if you only get exercise on the weekends yourself.
  • After a long week without exercise, your dog may be ready to get out and burn off energy. But because of their enthusiasm, many of the popular breeds, such as Labrador and golden retrievers, will overdo it.
  • Safety first—leashes are a plus or a must when you run.

Even the best-trained dogs can run into the path of a car or a territorial animal. And if you have to run when it’s dark out, put reflectors on your dog’s collar as well as on your clothes. Concrete and asphalt are tough on the paws, especially on hot days. Try to run on dirt paths or grass as much as possible. Gravel, cinders, and road salt can also irritate paws.

Take it easy in extreme weather. If it’s freezing cold or hot and steamy out, either keep your run short or play a little indoor fetch instead. The more active your dog is, the more water he’ll need. Make sure he has plenty of fresh water before and after your run. If you’re going for a long run, take some water along for him.

IMG_5367If your dog is getting bored with running or walking, take heart: there are other ways to get him the exercise he needs. A 15-minute game of fetch makes for a good workout. Supervised play with other dogs is a good option too. Tug-of-war is not a good game because it can damage his teeth and may increase aggressive behavior.

If you have the time and your dog has the inclination, you could even try running him through some agility obstacle courses, which incorporate a range of activities.

 

Or, by all means, if there is one in your area, you can visit K9 Fit Club!

 

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